Bringing Your Puppy Home

The information in this section is to help you prepare your home and family for life with your new puppy.

 

The Supplies You May Need

 

Before you bring your puppy home, be sure you have the following supplies:

 

ü  Premium pet food to get your new puppy off to a good start, ask your Breeder what food your Puppy is on as it is best not to change their diet right away

ü  Stainless steel, non-tip food and water bowls.

ü  Identification tags with your puppy's name, your name, phone number and your veterinarian's name and phone number. A collar and a leather or nylon 6-foot leash that's 1/2 - 3/4 inches wide (consider using a "breakaway" collar with plastic clips that will unsnap in case your puppy gets hung up on something).

ü  A home and travel crate that's airline approved and will accommodate your puppy's adult size. This crate will serve as your puppy's new "den" at home, when traveling or riding to the veterinarian's office. His scent in the crate will provide comfort and a sense of security during these stressful times.

ü  Stain remover for accidental soilings.

ü  Brushes and combs suited to your puppy's coat; ask your veterinarian or breeder about an appropriate brush or comb for your dog.

ü  Dog shampoo, toothbrush and paste.

ü  High-quality, safe chew toys to ease teething. Not from the Dollar Store

ü  Flea, tick and parasite controls PURCHASED THROUGH YOUR VETERINARIAN ONLY.

ü  Nail clippers.

ü  High Quality Treats

 

Helpful Hints    

  • Use stainless steel, non-tip food bowls, which won't break or absorb odors.
  • Toys with parts that squeak or whistle can be dangerous if swallowed.
  • For a comfortable collar fit, allow for two-fingers of space between the collar and your dog's neck; consider using an adjustable collar.

Making a Home Safe

To make your home safe for your new puppy, eliminate potential hazards around the house and pay attention to the following items:

  • Keep breakable objects out of reach.
  • Deny access to electrical cords by hiding or covering them; make outlets safe with plastic outlet plugs.
  • Safely store household chemicals.
  • Keep the following house and garden plants out of reach: poinsettias, azaleas, rhododendrons, dumb cane, Japanese yew, oleander and English ivy among others.
  • In the garage, be sure engine lubricants and other poisonous chemicals (especially antifreeze) are safely stored.
  • If you own a pool or hot tub, check the cover or the surrounding fence to be sure they're in good condition.
  • If you provide your puppy with an outdoor kennel, place it in an area that provides sun and shelter in the pen for playtime; be sure the kennel is large enough to comfortably accommodate your puppy's adult size. Your dog should never be left outside for extended periods.

The First Days at Home

The ideal time to bring home a new puppy is when the house is quiet. Discourage friends from stopping by and don't allow overnight guests. First establish a daily routine and follow these steps:

 

Step 1: Before bringing him in the house, take him to the area in your yard or home that will serve as his "bathroom" and spend a few minutes there. If he goes, praise him. If not, proceed into the house but be sure to take him to this spot each time he needs to use the bathroom.

 

Step 2: Take him to the room that accommodates your crate—this area will serve as his new "den". Put bedding and safe chew toys in the crate, leave the door open and line the area outside of the crate with newspaper, in case of an accident. Let him investigate the crate and the room. If he chews or urinates on his bedding, remove it from the crate and put fresh bedding.

 

Step 3: Observe and interact with your puppy while he's acclimating to his new den. This will help forge a sense of pack and establish you as the pack leader.

 

Special Puppy Concerns

Don't treat a puppy as adult dog. Treat him the same way you would your own infant: with patience, constant supervision and a gentle touch. The way you interact with your puppy at this age is critical to his socialization. Use these tips:

 

  • Supervise your puppy at all times and interact with him regularly.
  • Be alert for signs (sniffing and circling) that he has to go to the bathroom, then take him outside or to his special spot immediately.
  • A young puppy has no bladder control and will need to urinate immediately after eating, drinking, sleeping or playing. At night, he will need to relieve himself at least every three hours.
  • Don't punish an accident. Never push his nose in the waste or scold him. He won't understand, and may learn to go to the bathroom when you're out of sight.
  • Praise your puppy every time he goes to the bathroom outside.
  • Feed your puppy a formula designed for puppies. Like a baby, he needs nutritious, highly digestible food.

Meeting Resident Pets

Keep resident pets separated from your new puppy for a few days. After your new puppy is used to his new den area, put an expandable pet gate in the doorway or put your puppy in his crate. Give your resident pet access to the area. Let pets smell and touch each other through the crate or pet gate. Do this several times over the next few days. After that, give the resident pet access to the den area with your new puppy out of his crate. Supervise their meeting and go back to through-the-gate/crate meetings if trouble arises.

 

Crate Training

 

 

Training a puppy to be comfortable in a crate is a popular way to provide safe confinement during housetraining. The majority of puppies will rapidly accept crate confinement when you make the introduction fun. Since it is important to associate favorable things with the area where your puppy is confined, it is a good idea to play with him there, or simply spend some time reading or watching television nearby as he relaxes with a favorite chew toy. If he is only in the area when you leave, it becomes a social isolation area that he eventually may resist entering.

  • A good time to start crate training is at dinner time. Feed your puppy his dinner, one piece at a time, by tossing pieces of kibble into the crate for him to chase and eat. This way, you can make a game out of training.
  • When you pick up his toys, store them in the crate so he will enter on his own to play. You may even want to occasionally hide a biscuit in the crate as a nice surprise.
  • You should not use the crate for periods that exceed the length of time the pet can actually control the urge to urinate or defecate. If you are gone for long periods each day, you will need to provide a larger confinement area. You may want to consider using an exercise pen or small room.
  • Provide an area large enough so that if your puppy has to eliminate when you are gone, he can do it in a space that is separate from his sleeping area. A 15- to 30-square foot area is adequate for most puppies. If he chooses a specific place to eliminate, cover it with paper to make clean up easier
  • When socializing your puppy, you must keep his health needs in mind. Until your dog's vaccinations are complete, he is at risk of catching Parvo, a widespread and deadly disease. You should be extremely careful not to put your puppy down in public places until his shots are complete. Consult your veterinarian for advice about what else may pose a health risk for your puppy.

WHAT NOT TO DO

  • Corrections and reprimands are rarely effective by themselves.
  • Under no circumstances should your puppy be spanked, slapped, kicked, or physically punished in any way. There is a risk he will become hand shy or a fear-biter. Instead, offer a verbal reprimand followed by encouragement to chew on a proper chew toy.
  • To be most effective, the reprimand must be given during or immediately after the misbehavior, and every time it occurs.
  • Reprimands can backfire by either teaching the dog to be sneaky about chewing, or by teaching him not to chew anything, even toys, in your presence.

More Energy, More Protein

Research shows that puppies need twice as much energy as adult dogs. Dramatic growth at this stage means your puppy requires an energy-rich, nutrient-dense, complete and balanced diet. Puppies also require more protein than adult dogs. High-quality, animal-based protein will help your puppy create new body tissue.

 

One Size Does Not Fit All

Not all puppies have the same nutritional needs. Small-breed puppies have higher metabolism rates per pound and reach their mature adult weight faster than larger-breed puppies. And small-breed puppies need higher levels of protein, fat, calcium and phosphorus to support growth and development of bones, muscles and other tissues. So giving your puppy a food specially formulated for his breed size is the easiest way to make sure he’s getting the right balance of nutrients for his growth rate.

Small-breed puppies have another special feature: small mouths and stomachs. Make sure your puppy’s food has small kibble for easy chewing. A nutrient-dense formula will help make sure he’s getting a complete and balanced diet even though his stomach can only accommodate what seems like a small volume of food.